Insurance for Roofing Contractors

Already know what you need? Get started on your application by entering your zip code.

Prefer to speak with a CoverWallet consultant? Call (646) 844--9933 anytime

Why Roofing Contractors Need Insurance

Homeowners and businesses look to roofing contractors to provide quality work and keep their building free of unwanted water. Without your services, many would be unable to repair or replace a damaged roof. As a roofing contractor, you work long hours year-round and demand for roofing services increases after severe storms and long winters. Roofing contractors insurance is vital to your business’s financial well-being. All it takes is one slip or minor oversight, and you can end up dealing with a lawsuit instead of creating an income.

Companies categorized under this industry work mainly on roof related jobs such as roof treatment, spraying, coating, painting, and skylight installation.

Risks Roofing Contractors Could Face

Roofers face numerous risks every day. Take a look at some of the most costly:

  • Fall off the Roof: You work at great heights every day, and one misstep can send you or one of your employees falling to the ground. If you are injured and cannot complete the contract, the loss of income or costs to hire a subcontractor can be severe. If an employee injures themselves, you will need to pay their medical expenses.
  • Project Error: Attention to detail is crucial to the safety of your customer and business success. If you forget to install flashing or don’t fit it properly and a leak causes electrical damage, rotting wood or other havoc, the customer can hold you responsible for the damages. If it is a business, they can also press charges for loss of business income if they can’t remain open.
  • Injury: If a nonemployee visits your job site and trips over shingles on the ground breaking their ankle, your business is liable for the damages including medical expenses, lost income, and pain and anguish claims.
  • Falling Objects: It is common the slide old shingles off the roof to the ground. If your aim is off or something else drops instead, you can break a window or damage a vehicle leaving you with a big bill to pay.

Types of Coverage Roofing Contractors Need

Roofing contractors can choose from a long list of insurance policies. To properly protect yourself and business you need general liability, professional liability, and commercial property insurance. If you have employees, you also need worker’s compensation.

  • General Liability: Covers you when you accidentally damage a third party’s property or cause injury. It also includes coverage for libel and slander.
  • Professional Liability: Protects you if you miss a vital step in the roofing process that causes damage to your customer’s property. It also covers if you offer advice to customers that cause harm or injury.
  • Commercial Property: Pays to replace business property that is damaged by a covered circumstance or stolen from your place of business.
  • Work Comp: This coverage is mandated in most states once you have three employees. It pays medical bills and lost wages if an employee injures themselves while working for you.
  • Business Auto: Pays expenses that result from an accident you are held responsible for. If you use a personal auto, you still need non-owned and hired auto insurance to protect you when driving for business purposes.

How Much Does Roofing Contractor Insurance Cost?

Roofing insurance costs depend on the insurance carrier’s view of your services and risks. Most carriers ask for loss runs, experience, whether you have employees, and copies of any safety policies in place to calculate a premium. Request a roofing insurance quote today by completing our online quote form.

What type of insurance does this industry need?

Policy What is it? Why get it Popularity in your industry Want free quotes?
General Liability
This policy protects your business in case of third party claims, such as bodily injury or property damage. For example, the common "slip-and-fall" claim would be covered by your General Liability policy. General Liability insurance is often considered to be the core coverage, particularly for businesses that regularly physically interact with customers or sell physical goods. In addition, many businesses have a contract, like a loan or a lease, requiring that they have this coverage.

What is it: This policy protects your business in case of third party claims, such as bodily injury or property damage. For example, the common "slip-and-fall" claim would be covered by your General Liability policy.

Why get it: General Liability insurance is often considered to be the core coverage, particularly for businesses that regularly physically interact with customers or sell physical goods. In addition, many businesses have a contract, like a loan or a lease, requiring that they have this coverage.

Professional Liability
This policy, common in the professional services industry, helps to protect your business if a client believes they've suffered a loss due to a mistake or error made in a professional capacity. Your business may have contracts with clients or partners that require Professional Liability coverage, provide a "warranty or guarantee," or have clauses that require you to "indemnify or hold harmless" your clients. If so, Professional Liability coverage is often recommended. This coverage is also commonly recommended for any businesses providing advice related to legal or financial matters.

What is it: This policy, common in the professional services industry, helps to protect your business if a client believes they've suffered a loss due to a mistake or error made in a professional capacity.

Why get it: Your business may have contracts with clients or partners that require Professional Liability coverage, provide a "warranty or guarantee," or have clauses that require you to "indemnify or hold harmless" your clients. If so, Professional Liability coverage is often recommended. This coverage is also commonly recommended for any businesses providing advice related to legal or financial matters.

Workers Compensation
Workers Compensation covers an employee's lost wages and the cost of resulting medical treatment if they suffer a work-related injury or disease. It also covers services needed to help the employee recover and return to work. Workers Compensation coverage is mandatory in most states. The number of employees after which it's required differs by state, but you will generally need coverage once you have employees.

What is it: Workers Compensation covers an employee's lost wages and the cost of resulting medical treatment if they suffer a work-related injury or disease. It also covers services needed to help the employee recover and return to work.

Why get it: Workers Compensation coverage is mandatory in most states. The number of employees after which it's required differs by state, but you will generally need coverage once you have employees.

Inland Marine
Inland Marine insurance covers goods in-transit either on land or through shallow water, as well as certain types of movable property (such as medical equipment). If your business has valuable equipment which regularly needs to be moved, then this can be a core policy to protect your property.

What is it: Inland Marine insurance covers goods in-transit either on land or through shallow water, as well as certain types of movable property (such as medical equipment).

Why get it: If your business has valuable equipment which regularly needs to be moved, then this can be a core policy to protect your property.

Commercial Auto
Commercial Auto insurance provides coverages such as liability, collision, comprehensive, medical payments and uninsured motorist coverage. Any vehicle on the road must be insured, and any incidents that occur while a vehicle is being used for business purposes may not be covered by a personal auto policy. That's why it is so important to make sure you have Commercial Auto insurance for any vehicles owned by the business.

What is it: Commercial Auto insurance provides coverages such as liability, collision, comprehensive, medical payments and uninsured motorist coverage.

Why get it: Any vehicle on the road must be insured, and any incidents that occur while a vehicle is being used for business purposes may not be covered by a personal auto policy. That's why it is so important to make sure you have Commercial Auto insurance for any vehicles owned by the business.

Umbrella Insurance
Umbrella insurance offers excess liability protection in the case that your General Liability, Commercial Auto Liability, and/or Employer's Liability coverage is insufficient. It essentially acts as a "back-up" plan, providing additional financial protection in the case that your business faces a particularly large claim that exceeds a single policy's limits. This policy can be particularly valuable for a business that faces a variety of risks and has multiple liability policies.

What is it: Umbrella insurance offers excess liability protection in the case that your General Liability, Commercial Auto Liability, and/or Employer's Liability coverage is insufficient. It essentially acts as a "back-up" plan, providing additional financial protection in the case that your business faces a particularly large claim that exceeds a single policy's limits.

Why get it: This policy can be particularly valuable for a business that faces a variety of risks and has multiple liability policies.

Errors & Omissions (E&O)
This policy, common in the professional services industry, helps to protect your business if a client believes they've suffered a loss due to an error or omission on your part. Your business may have contracts with clients or partners that require E&O coverage, provide a "warranty or guarantee," or have clauses that require you to "indemnify or hold harmless" your clients. If so, E&O coverage is often recommended. This coverage is also commonly recommended for any businesses providing advice related to legal or financial matters.

What is it: This policy, common in the professional services industry, helps to protect your business if a client believes they've suffered a loss due to an error or omission on your part.

Why get it: Your business may have contracts with clients or partners that require E&O coverage, provide a "warranty or guarantee," or have clauses that require you to "indemnify or hold harmless" your clients. If so, E&O coverage is often recommended. This coverage is also commonly recommended for any businesses providing advice related to legal or financial matters.

Are you ready to get down to business?

Just click get a quote and you're off.