Insurance for Photographers

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How Photographers and Insurance Connect

Photographers often have a blend of technical and creative skills - they need to know how to operate camera equipment, but they also need to have an artistic eye in order to take captivating photos. A photographer could take many career paths: they could work at a newspaper producing photos to appear alongside news articles, they could work in-house at a company taking photos of their products and marketing campaigns, but many go the independent route and work for a variety of clients, perhaps specializing in one industry or type of photography.

Independent photographers often purchase and store their own equipment, travel for assignments, and deal directly with their customers. As business owners providing a professional service, they face a number of risks that require insurance to ensure their business and assets are protected in any situation.

The Risks Associated with Being a Photographer

The most expensive part of starting and maintaining a photography business is probably the equipment. In addition to a pricey camera that can cost thousands of dollars, professional photographers usually need multiple stands and tripods, lenses, film, backup batteries, and more. Expensive gear can easily be ruined if you’re taking photos in the rain, someone knocks something over, or there’s some other type of accident. Expensive camera equipment is also a tempting target for thieves.

In addition to protecting themselves from costly equipment theft or damage, photographers must also take care to preserve the photos they’ve taken. Many assignments will be “once-in-a-lifetime” experiences, like weddings or important cultural events, meaning lost photos can’t simply be re-shot. A faulty memory card can end up being a pretty big deal. And even if photos are preserved, customers might not always be satisfied with them. If a customer doesn’t feel they received the services promised in your agreement, they could sue.

Just like other small business owners, photographers who work for themselves face numerous risks in the course of doing business, and they need insurance to protect themselves.

How to Mitigate Risks & Choose the Right Insurance

Photographers should be very careful to protect their equipment and photos while they are working. One easy way to mitigate risk is to purchase high quality camera and equipment protective cases for safe transportation. There are also tools photographers can invest in to prevent things like water and sun damage, when appropriate. Additionally, photographers should ensure that any photos they’ve taken at work are securely backed up to prevent loss.

Unfortunately, no matter how careful a photographer is with their equipment and work, accidents still happen. That’s why it’s important to purchase a well-rounded mix of insurance policies that protect you, your equipment, and your business no matter what:

General Liability Insurance

As a photographer dealing with heavy equipment, you face the risk of injuring someone or causing damage to someone else’s property while you are working. Someone could trip over a cord, or you could accidentally drop a heavy piece of equipment and damage a floor. General Liability Insurance will cover you for these incidents where a third party has suffered damages, and pay for any associated legal fees, medical costs, or property repairs.

Commercial Property Insurance

Commercial Property Insurance covers property you own, including the studio where you conduct business and equipment that generally is kept in the studio, such as computers and lights. If your equipment is damaged, lost, or stolen, or something happens to your studio in a covered situation, Commercial Property Insurance will pay out the cost of replacement or repairs. Since you’ve invested significantly in your equipment, it makes sense to investing in insuring it as well.

Camera and Gear Insurance

If you transport your equipment to multiple locations, property insurance won’t cover you completely. Property insurance policies typically only cover losses that happen in your primary place of business. For full coverage, you should also purchase an Inland Marine Insurance policy. This type of insurance covers your camera equipment while you are on the go, and can even cover rented equipment.

E&O Insurance

If you offer professional services as a photographer, you should also strongly consider Errors & Omissions Insurance, also known as Professional Liability Insurance. This type of insurance protects you if you make a mistake that causes damage to your client. For example, you could schedule the photo shoot for the wrong day, lose a memory card, or forget to take certain agreed-upon shots during an event. All of these situations make for unhappy customers who could sue. Errors & Omissions Insurance will cover you if you need to re-construct certain shots to make the customer happy, and if the situation winds up in court, it will pay for your legal costs.

Independent photographers wear many hats: they need to generate new business leads, make customers happy, set up equipment, have the technical know-how to take photos in different types of situations, and be creative to produce great work. What shouldn’t they have to worry about? Lawsuits and equipment damage. By purchasing comprehensive insurance coverage, you can focus on doing what you love - photography - and rest easy knowing that an unhappy customer or equipment theft can’t bankrupt your business.

What type of insurance does this industry need?

Policy What is it? Why get it Popularity in your industry Want free quotes?
General Liability
This policy protects your business claims of bodily injury, property damage or advertising and personal injury (aka reputational damage). For example, the oh-so-common "slip and fall" claim would be handled under your General Liability policy. More likely than not, you have a contract, like a loan or a lease or mortgage, requiring you have General Liablity insurance. Even if you don't, this is the absolute best measure you can take to make sure you're covered in case of a law suit against your business.

What is it: This policy protects your business claims of bodily injury, property damage or advertising and personal injury (aka reputational damage). For example, the oh-so-common "slip and fall" claim would be handled under your General Liability policy.

Why get it: More likely than not, you have a contract, like a loan or a lease or mortgage, requiring you have General Liablity insurance. Even if you don't, this is the absolute best measure you can take to make sure you're covered in case of a law suit against your business.

Errors & Omissions (E&O)
This insurance covers a potentially wide range of issues, but specifically is meant to help your company cover potential damages as a result of errors or omissions that occur while performing contracted work. If your company offers advice to clients, it’s imperative that you have E&O Insurance. This will cover claims of negligence, faulty advice and subcontractor errors.

What is it: This insurance covers a potentially wide range of issues, but specifically is meant to help your company cover potential damages as a result of errors or omissions that occur while performing contracted work.

Why get it: If your company offers advice to clients, it’s imperative that you have E&O Insurance. This will cover claims of negligence, faulty advice and subcontractor errors.

Business Owners Policy (BOP)
Also, known as BOP, this is a type of policy that packages together elements from General Liability and Commercial Property. It may also include elements of crime and EPLI, depending on the carrier. Depending on the eligbility requirements (which vary by carrier). this is a great way for a small or mid-size business to get many of the protections it needs (also listed here) in one policy. It's the simplest way to get most if not all the essential coverage you need for your business.

What is it: Also, known as BOP, this is a type of policy that packages together elements from General Liability and Commercial Property. It may also include elements of crime and EPLI, depending on the carrier. Depending on the eligbility requirements (which vary by carrier). this is a great way for a small or mid-size business to get many of the protections it needs (also listed here) in one policy.

Why get it: It's the simplest way to get most if not all the essential coverage you need for your business.

Workers Compensation
Workers compensation coverage covers lost wages and medical treatment resulting from an employee’s work-related injury or illness. It also covers services needed to help an employee recover and return to work. This is the law in all 50 states. As soon as you have your first non-owner employee, it's time to get Workers Comp insurance. Not having this insurance can lead to hefty fines, and of course, it means the business has to pay for any workplace injury claims.

What is it: Workers compensation coverage covers lost wages and medical treatment resulting from an employee’s work-related injury or illness. It also covers services needed to help an employee recover and return to work.

Why get it: This is the law in all 50 states. As soon as you have your first non-owner employee, it's time to get Workers Comp insurance. Not having this insurance can lead to hefty fines, and of course, it means the business has to pay for any workplace injury claims.

Commercial Property
This policy protects the business' assets, and is appropriate whether you own or lease your space or work from home. It can be customized in two ways: (1) insure more/less property and (2) insure against more/fewer causes of damage (e.g., earthquakes) If you have a mortgage or a lease, you are likely required to have property insurance. Even if you are not, this is the best way to protect the building you are in and the business property you have in case of a natural disaster or some other accident. And if the business is at fault for property damange? It helps pay those claims too.

What is it: This policy protects the business' assets, and is appropriate whether you own or lease your space or work from home. It can be customized in two ways: (1) insure more/less property and (2) insure against more/fewer causes of damage (e.g., earthquakes)

Why get it: If you have a mortgage or a lease, you are likely required to have property insurance. Even if you are not, this is the best way to protect the building you are in and the business property you have in case of a natural disaster or some other accident. And if the business is at fault for property damange? It helps pay those claims too.

Hired & Non-Owned Auto
This insurance covers a vehicle that has been hired by a company to be used for business-related purposes, it also covers the passengers inside. If your company hires vehicles or allows employees to borrow company vehicles for business purposes, you will need this insurance. It will cover claims of personal injury and property damage should something go wrong on the job.

What is it: This insurance covers a vehicle that has been hired by a company to be used for business-related purposes, it also covers the passengers inside.

Why get it: If your company hires vehicles or allows employees to borrow company vehicles for business purposes, you will need this insurance. It will cover claims of personal injury and property damage should something go wrong on the job.

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